Restaurants Serving Connecticut

Local restaurants are a vital part of Connecticut’s economy and a source of good-paying jobs to workers from all walks of life. Unfortunately, in recent years ambiguity in state laws and guidance relating to tipped employees have led to confusion and even lawsuits. Thankfully, recent changes have made the rules clearer and more workable for both employers and servers. Today, restaurants are working harder than ever during the pandemic to keep their doors open, keep their workers employed, and keep serving Connecticut.

SERVING

CONNECTICUT'S

ECONOMY

One tenth of all Connecticut workers
rely on restaurants to make their living.
Restaurants—composed of many small and
family businesses—is one of the hardest hit
by the pandemic. The restaurant industry is
composed mostly of small and family-run
businesses, who were among the
hardest hit by the pandemic.”

One tenth of all Connecticut workers rely on restaurants to make their living. Restaurants—composed of many small and family businesses—is one of the hardest hit by the pandemic. The restaurant industry is composed mostly of small and family-run businesses, who were among the hardest hit by the pandemic.

Facts about Connecticut's restaurants

Connecticut restaurants are mostly small businesses, many of whom are family run. They are key drivers of our local economy, and they have now been devastated during the pandemic. They need our support more than ever so they can be part of our economic recovery.

Before the pandemic, the Connecticut restaurant industry accounted for 160,000 jobs in our state, nearly a tenth of Connecticut’s workforce. Restaurants care deeply about these many employees, and want to stay in business so they can continue employing them in the years ahead.

Restaurant owners know that customers return because of the service they’ve received, and they know their employees’ happiness is critical to providing good service.

SERVING GOOD

WAGES FOR

CONNECTICUT

WORKERS

Server jobs are a source of good income and opportunity for tens of thousands of state residents. The average server in Connecticut makes $25 dollars per hour, more than double the current minimum wage. This is possible thanks to the tip credit system used here in Connecticut and also in the vast majority of other states across the country.

Server jobs are a source of good income and
opportunity for tens of thousands of state
residents. The average server in Connecticut
makes $25 dollars per hour, more than double
the current minimum wage. This is possible
thanks to the tip credit system used here in
Connecticut and also in the vast majority
of other states across the country.

Server jobs are a source of good income and opportunity for tens of thousands of state residents. The average server in Connecticut makes $25 dollars per hour, more than double the current minimum wage. This is possible thanks to the tip credit system used here in Connecticut and also in the vast majority of other states across the country.

SERVING GOOD

WAGES FOR

CONNECTICUT

WORKERS

Server jobs are a source of good income and
opportunity for tens of thousands of state
residents. The average server in Connecticut
makes $25 dollars per hour, more than double
the current minimum wage. This is possible
thanks to the tip credit system used here in
Connecticut and also in the vast majority
of other states across the country.

Server jobs are a source of good income and opportunity for tens of thousands of state residents. The average server in Connecticut makes $25 dollars per hour, more than double the current minimum wage. This is possible thanks to the tip credit system used here in Connecticut and also in the vast majority of other states across the country.

Facts about Connecticut's Tip Credit System

Contrary to what some people think, tipped workers can never make less than the state minimum wage. In fact, most tipped employees deservedly take home well-north of the minimum wage: the average server in Connecticut makes $25 dollars per hour, more than double the current minimum wage.

The tip credit system allows workers to take home more money than they would without it, and servers from places that have done away with the credit have been clear that they and their fellow servers do better with a tip credit place in place.

Servers jobs are also a great source of employment and good earnings for segments of our population that unfairly face employment discrimination in other sectors.

SERVING THE FACTS

ON CHANGES TO STATE LAW,

AND RECENT LAWSUITS

Restaurants have been good partners in our
community in the effort to find solutions
for workers and their families. They have
collaborated with state lawmakers from both
parties to bridge policy discrepancies, and clarify ambiguities
in the law to the benefit of restaurants and
their employees.

Restaurants have been good partners in our community in the effort to find solutions for workers and their families. They have collaborated with state lawmakers from both parties to bridge policy discrepancies, and clarify ambiguities in the law to the benefit of restaurants and their employees.

Facts about recent legislation and lawsuits
relating to the tip credit system

In recent years, there has been a debate in Connecticut over how the state regulated the ways restaurants tracked the time and work of their tipped employees. The State Department of Labor issued guidance for restaurants that was, at times, contradictory to state statutes, creating confusion for restaurants and employees.

In 2019, the Connecticut restaurant industry worked with state officials to resolve these discrepancies. The result was a bill that was passed on a bipartisan basis with an overwhelming majority of the General Assembly, and then signed into law by the Governor. The law required the state to draft new rules that would provide a clearer regulatory environment for both restaurants and their employees.

Unfortunately, despite this successful bipartisan effort, this debate has continued to play out in state courts. Restaurants have had to continue defending how they followed state guidance in the period before a solution was found, even though state officials of both parties acknowledged the lack of clarity, and the need for a fix.